Your body is an apartment building.

“Your body is an apartment building.”

~ Ajahn Amaro

“There is a biologist named Lewis Thomas, whose work I appreciate very much. He describes how our human bodies are ‘shared, rented, and occupied’ by countless other tiny organisms, without whom we couldn’t ‘move a muscle, drum a finger, or think a thought.’ Our body is a community, and the trillions of non-human cells in our body are even more numerous than the human cells. Without them, we could not be here in this moment. Without them, we wouldn’t be able to think, to feel, or to speak. There are, he says, no solitary beings. The whole planet is one giant, living, breathing cell, with all its working parts linked in symbiosis.”

~ Thích Nhất Hạnh

The Art of Living

Photo: Astronaut Tracy Caldwell Dyson on the ISS in 2010

The void nature of the mind is like the nature of the mirror

“A master may show the disciple a mirror and explain how the mirror itself does not judge the reflections arising in it to be either beautiful or ugly: the mirror is not changed by whatever kind of reflection may arise, nor is its capacity to reflect impaired. It is then explained that the void nature of the mind is like the nature of the mirror, pure, clear, and limpid, and that no matter what arises, the void essence of the mind can never be lost, damaged, or tarnished.”

CHÖGYAL NAMKHAI NORBU RINPOCHE
The Crystal And The Way Of Light: Sutra, Tantra And Dzogchen

When I understand that this glass is already broken, every minute with it is precious.

“Do you see this glass?” Ajahn Chah asked. “I love this glass. It holds the water admirably. When the sun shines on it, it reflects the light beautifully. When I tap it, it has a lovely ring. Yet for me, this glass is already broken. When the wind knocks it over or my elbow knocks it off the shelf and it falls to the ground and shatters, I say, ‘Of course.’ But when I understand that this glass is already broken, every minute with it is precious.”

It is a state of intelligence that questions our life and the meaning of life.

Buddha nature is not regarded as a peaceful state of mind or, for that matter, as a disturbed one either. It is a state of intelligence that questions our life and the meaning of life. It is the foundation of a search. A lot of things haven’t been answered in our life—and we are still searching for the questions. The questioning is buddha nature. It is a state of potential.

—Glimpses of the Profound: Four Short Works
by Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, page 21