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Free from obvious movements of the mind such as aversion for enemies, unpleasant feelings, or attraction toward pleasant things.

KYABJE DILGO KHYENTSE RINPOCHE

The mind is not something that can be looked at with the eyes or grasped with the hands. The mind has to look at itself. What we need to do is not to analyze this mental darkness discursively; rather we have to first let the mind rest in a state of complete naturalness or simplicity, just as it is, without falling into distraction. A state will be soon attained that is free from obvious movements of the mind such as aversion for enemies, unpleasant feelings, or attraction toward pleasant things. This state is also free from the opaque dullness that one experienced before. It is a state that is lucid, clear, and spacious, like the experience of looking into the vast sky.

**Commentaries on
Jamgön Mipham Rinpoche’s
‘The Lamp That Dispels Darkness’ – Collected Works, Vol III pg 677 – Shambhala

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Radiate boundless love towards the entire world

Radiate boundless love towards the entire world — above, below, and across — unhindered, without ill will, without enmity.
– Buddha

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So, what makes you a Buddhist?

So, what makes you a Buddhist? You may not have been born in a Buddhist country or to a Buddhist family, you may not wear robes or shave your head, you may eat meat and idolize Eminem and Paris Hilton. That doesn’t mean you cannot be a Buddhist. In order to be a Buddhist, you must accept that all compounded phenomena are impermanent, all emotions are pain, all things have no inherent existence, and enlightenment is beyond concepts.

It’s not necessary to be constantly and endlessly mindful of these four truths. But they must reside in your mind. You don’t walk around persistently remembering your own name, but when someone asks your name, you remember it instantly. There is no doubt. Anyone who accepts these four seals, even independently of Buddha’s teachings, even never having heard the name Shakyamuni Buddha, can be considered to be on the same path as he.

– Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

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The wise one speaks of peace and is unstained by the opinions of the world.

The one who wanders independent in the world, free from opinions and viewpoints, does not grasp them and enter into disputations and arguments. As the lotus rises on its stalk unsoiled by the mud and the water, so the wise one speaks of peace and is unstained by the opinions of the world.

– Buddha

Sutta Nipata

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The natural state of the mind is neither happiness nor unhappiness.

“The natural state of the mind is neither happiness nor unhappiness. When feeling enters the mind then happiness or unhappiness is born. If we have mindfulness then we know pleasant feeling as pleasant feeling. The mind which knows will not pick it up. Happiness is there but it’s ‘outside’ the mind, not buried within the mind. The mind simply knows it clearly.

If we separate unhappiness from the mind, does that mean there is no suffering, that we don’t experience it? Yes, we experience it, but we know mind as mind, feeling as feeling. We don’t cling to that feeling or carry it around.

The Buddha separated these things through knowledge. Did he have suffering? He knew the state of suffering but he didn’t cling to it, so we say that he cut suffering off. And there was happiness too, but he knew that happiness, if it’s not known, is like a poison. He didn’t hold it to be himself. Happiness was there through knowledge, but it didn’t exist in his mind. Thus we say that he separated happiness and unhappiness from his mind.”

“The Buddha knew that because both happiness and unhappiness are unsatisfactory, they have the same value. When happiness arose he let it go. He had right practice, seeing that both these things have equal values and drawbacks. They come under the Law of Dhamma, that is, they are unstable and unsatisfactory. Once born, they die. When he saw this, right view arose, the right way of practice became clear. No matter what sort of feeling or thinking arose in his mind, he knew it as simply the continuous play of happiness and unhappiness. He didn’t cling to them.”

Ajahn Chah

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Clouds are impermanent; the sky is always there.

“When we gain ultimate confidence in the view and meditation, all karmic and emotional confusion is liberated. This is analogous to clouds in the sky. No matter how dense the clouds are, when a strong wind arises, the sky will become absolutely clear. Clouds are impermanent; the sky is always there. When clouds gather, the sky does not disappear, and when there are no clouds, the sky does not actually become any more brilliant. We should know that vital point of liberation.”

Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche – Oral Transmitions on ‘Three Words That Strike The Vital Point’ – on Action – Collected Works Vol III p 645, Shambhala

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Vain thoughts

BUDDHA SPEAKS

“I am”, …… ………….is a vain thought;
“I am not”.. ………….is a vain thought;
“I shall be”.. …………is a vain thought;
“I shall not be”……… is a vain thought.

Vain thoughts are a sickness, an ulcer, a thorn. But after overcoming all vain thoughts, one is called a silent thinker.
And the thinker, the Silent One, does no more arise, no more pass away, no more tremble, no more desire.

***Majjhima Nikaya Sutta 140.

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Living with the Cobra

So we say that mental activity is like the deadly poisonous cobra. If we don’t interfere with a cobra, it simply goes its own way. Even though it may be extremely poisonous, we are not affected by it; we don’t go near it or take hold of it, and it doesn’t bite us. The cobra does what is natural for a cobra to do. That’s the way it is. If you are clever you’ll leave it alone. And so you let be that which is good. You also let be that which is not good – let it be according to its own nature. Let be your liking and your disliking, the same way as you don’t interfere with the cobra.

From: Living with the Cobra – Ajahn Chah

A brief talk given as final instruction to an elderly Englishwoman who spent two months under the guidance of Ajahn Chah at the end of 1978 and beginning of 1979.

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If you react to them, however, by liking or disliking, that isn’t wisdom.

If you see things with real insight, then there is no stickiness in your relationship to them. They come – pleasant and unpleasant – you see them and there is no attachment. They come and they pass. Even if the worst kinds of defilement come up, such as greed or anger, there’s enough wisdom to see their impermanent nature and allow them to just fade away. If you react to them, however, by liking or disliking, that isn’t wisdom. You’re only creating more suffering for yourself.

Ajahn Chah

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The Mahayana emphasizes the need to understand the complete nature of all phenomena.

MINDROLLING JETSUN KHANDRO RINPOCHE

Vajrayana and the Mahayana View of Wholeness.

The Mahayana emphasizes the need to understand the complete nature of all phenomena. It is a view of “wholeness.”

Ordinarily, the mind merely connects with appearances: the appearance of forms, sounds, thoughts, feelings, and so on. We then make assumptions based on how things appear, how they sound, how they feel. This is a very subtle moment: this moment of grasping at some impression, clinging to it, and in that grasping and clinging, immediately articulating an assumption.

Simply put: you do not take time to fully understand what you see, hear, think, or feel. Your understanding arises from fleeting moments that can only produce assumptions, all of which are based on what you stand to gain or lose in the moment. This builds up sediments of
deluded perception, through which you cannot see things clearly.

It is not the sights, sounds, thoughts, and feelings that are deluded; you create delusions, through the speed of making biased assumptions. When the mind has no time to open up to the wholeness, or completeness, of appearances, the sediment of delusion settles into “good” and “bad” assumptions. And at that point, every form, sound, thought, and other sensation you relate is dominated by ego’s personal preferences and convenience.

The Power of Perception.

To understand vajrayana, know that we are talking about perception.
What is meant by the “complete” nature of perception? What makes a sound or thought “whole”? Are they merely what you imagine them to be, or is there more to it?
A very traditional analogy is this: When someone comes to you with a complaint, are you able to really appreciate the whole story—whether you like that person or not? A wise person will listen to the whole story and give an unbiased judgment in the situation. Any judgment based merely on appearances is an ignorantly made judgment, and any decision will be very biased or partial. This example applies to the habitual ways we relate to everything we see, hear, and think.

Our judgments and opinions about appearances are very powerful, in that they become causes that bring about effects. The karma we create builds a sphere of experience for ourselves and for the world at large. Karma is propelled by our opinions and judgments, and
when those opinions and judgments are not sane, they bring about negative karma.

No one intends to create negative karma. But a mind that does not perceive things sanely, or wholly, churns out unending amounts of karma. And karma dominated by ego’s biased views, preferences, and conveniences becomes negative karma—simply by not seeing things clearly and completely.

**An Introduction to Ngöndro.