He must stay at the half-way mark, the middle point, and not be heedless.

The practice of Dhamma goes against our habits, the truth goes against our desires; so there is difficulty in the practice. Some things which we understand as wrong may be right, while the things we take to be right may be wrong. Why is this? Because our minds are in darkness, we don’t clearly see the Truth. We don’t really know anything and so are fooled by people’s lies. They point out what is right as being wrong and we believe it; that which is wrong, they say is right, and we believe that. This is because we are not yet our own masters. Our moods lie to us constantly. We shouldn’t take this mind and its opinions as our guide, because it doesn’t know the truth.

Some people don’t want to listen to others at all, but this is not the way of a man of wisdom. A wise man listens to everything. One who listens to Dhamma must listen just the same, whether he likes it or not, and not blindly believe or disbelieve. He must stay at the half-way mark, the middle point, and not be heedless. He just listens and then contemplates, giving rise to the right results accordingly.

Ajahn Chah

You will become less judgmental, less corrective, less reactive, less black-and-white, less critical, less apt to blame and less tormented by others and their faults and views.

As your consciousness, refinement and pureness of heart expand you will become less judgmental, less corrective, less reactive, less black-and-white, less critical, less apt to blame and less tormented by others and their faults and views. As the aperture of your heart opens to love you will receive more of the light of compassion, acceptance, gentleness, grace and understanding. The more evolved you are the less you will agree or disagree with others, and the more you will gently sift through the fullness of what people are offering and gratefully take only what you need. The more spiritually aware you become, the more you will focus on your own development and less on the imperfections of others. As an evolved being, you will begin to see pettiness, quarreling and correcting others as non-constructive and crude. As you evolve, you will learn that the only person you need to correct is yourself.

Bryant Mcgill

Just observe the world, leave it alone.

As you become spiritually mature, you become humble, filled with humility and love and you smile at the world, you understand its nature as maya. Its constant change. You no longer hate the world nor love the world. Just observe the world, leave it alone. You stop debating with people, arguing with people, trying to prove points. You just leave everything alone and leave everybody alone and you’re at peace with yourself and the world.

This happens automatically when you take refuge in the Self, in the heart. In other words your job is not to look for peace, for harmony, for justice, for love, for these are fleeting things in this world. Your work is to take refuge in the heart, in the Self. Then these verities come by themselves. In other words you become a living example, a living embodiment of consciousness, of divine love, of peace. Whereas if you just look for peace and harmony in this world, you’re doing something external and you’ll never really find it.

Robert Adams

The truth is not self and not other

‘We save all beings by realizing there are no beings. The perfection of wisdom is to see this fact: ultimately, the truth is not self and not other; there is no arahant, no bodhisattva, no birth, no death. Though the heart might incline to compassion, it’s only when we cultivate this wisdom element as well that there is going to be true spiritual fulfillment.’

– Ajahn Amaro

Practice in a straightforward way.

Practice in a straightforward way. There is no need to live in fantasy and ‘pretend’ to be anything other than what you are. Be honest and open with yourself – if you are a good person, recognize that goodness and build upon it. If you are a deluded person, recognize that delusion and begin to disentangle yourself from it, be rid of it. It is essential that your practice be pure, straightforward and honest.

~ Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche

In the beginning I took the teacher as the teacher

..In the beginning I took the teacher as the teacher,
..ในตอนแรเรามองครูเป็นครู

..In the middle I took the scriptures as the teacher,
..ตอนกลางเราใช้พระคัมภีร์เป็นครู

..In the end I took my own
mind as the teacher.
..ในท้ายสุดเราใช้จิตเจ้าของเป็น
ครูสิ

– Shabkar

from the book “The Life of Shabkar: The Autobiography of a Tibetan Yogin”

The practice of Dhamma is not dependent on being a monk, a novice or a layperson.

The practice of Dhamma is not dependent on being a monk, a novice or a layperson; it depends on straightening out your understanding. If our understanding is correct, we arrive at peace. Whether you are ordained
or not it’s the same, every person has the chance to practice Dhamma, to contemplate it. We all contemplate the same thing. If you attain peace, it’s all the same peace; it’s the same path, with the same methods.

Therefore the Buddha didn’t discriminate between laypeople and monks, he taught all people to practice in order to know the truth of the saṅkhārā. When we know this truth, we let them go. If we know the truth there will be no more becoming or birth. How is there no more birth? There is no way for birth to take place because we fully know the truth of saṅkhārā. If
we fully know the truth, then there is peace. Having or not having, it’s all the same. Gain and loss are one. The Buddha taught us to know this. This is peace; peace from happiness, unhappiness, gladness and sorrow.

Ajahn Chah

Don’t judge others whether they’re good or bad.

Question Western Australia: I am a woman in my late 50s. My mind always justifies, judges, criticises, makes assumptions, condemns, approves, disapproves, likes, dislikes, etc. It does those constantly. For example, when I meet someone, my mind instantly tell me what I dislike about this person. So, why my mind always behave like my own enemy? Is this mind, myself?

Than Ajahn: These are the habits you’ve been doing in your past lives. So, it becomes your habits now. However, you can break these habits by using mindfulness. You have to stop it when you know that you are criticizing or judging others. Instead of criticizing or judging others, you should analyse things as they are.

The Buddha has said that you analyse everything by seeing that everything you come into contact with is impermanent and it cannot be under your control all the time. This is the way you should behave towards things or people. If you want everything to be under your control or you want everything to be permanent, you will only be troubled by it because you can’t do it.

Don’t judge others whether they’re good or bad. It’s okay to know if they are good or bad but it’s more important to know that they are impermanent. It’s more important to know that you can’t really do anything about them. You can’t change them or manage them. Sooner or later, they will be beyond your control. And if you try to control them, it will only make you unhappy.

Youtube: “Dhamma in English, Dec 18, 2018.”

By Ajahn Suchart Abhijāto

Experience your difficulties as blessings.

You will fall sick, experience pain, and encounter many adverse circumstances. At such times do not think, ‘Although I am practicing the Dharma, I have nothing but trouble. The Dharma cannot be so great. I have followed a teacher and done so much practice, and yet hard times still befall me.’ Such thoughts are wrong views. You should realize that through the blessing and power of the practice, by experiencing sickness and other difficulties now, you are purifying and ridding yourself of negative actions. By purifying them while you have the chance, you will later go from bliss to bliss. So do not think, ‘I don’t deserve this illness, these obstacles, these negative influences.’ Experience your difficulties as blessings. When you do experience such difficulties, you should be very happy and avoid having adverse thoughts like, ‘Why are such terrible things happening to me?’

— Kjabye Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, from “Zurchungpa’s Testament”

Conceiving of your body as a servant

Conceiving of your body as a servant or a thing to ferry you about,
Don’t allow it to rest in idleness for even just a single moment;
Use it well, spurring on your entire body, speech and mind to virtue.

– Chatral Rinpoche

from the book “Compassionate Action”